Phase 1 – The State of Boys

The changing cultural landscape for boys — at home, school, and work — could impact how process masculinity internally. This panel of subject matter experts will analyze current research and provide thought-provoking commentary. About Gary Barker, PhD: Gary Barker is…

Phase 1 - The State of Boys

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The changing cultural landscape for boys — at home, school, and work — could impact how process masculinity internally. This panel of subject matter experts will analyze current research and provide thought-provoking commentary.

About Gary Barker, PhD:

Gary Barker is CEO and co-founder of Promundo, an NGO that started in Brazil and now has six affiliated country offices. He has worked 20+ years in more than 40 countries to engage men and boys in achieving gender equality and ending violence against women and girls, and has carried out research on masculinities and gender equality. He is co-founder of MenCare, a global campaign working in more than 50 countries to promote men’s involvement as equitable, non-violent caregivers, and is co-founder and board member of MenEngage, a global network of more than 700 NGOs across 50 countries working to engage men as allies in gender equality. Barker also leads IMAGES (the International Men and Gender Equality Survey), the largest ever survey of men’s attitudes and behaviors related to violence, fatherhood, and gender equality, which to date includes more than 40 countries.

Barker is an Ashoka Fellow and received the Voices of Solidarity Award from Vital Voices for his work to engage men for gender equality. He is co-author of the 2015, 2017, and 2019 State of the World’s Fathers. He has advised UN agencies and numerous national governments and foundations on approaches to engaging men in violence prevention and gender equality. In 2018 and 2019 he was named by Apolitical as one of the “most influential people in gender policy around the world.” He holds a PhD in developmental psychology and is an Affiliated Researcher with the University of Coimbra in Portugal. He currently lives in Washington, DC.

About Judy Chu:

Judy Y. Chu, Ed.D. is a Lecturer in Human Biology and Affiliate of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University, where she teaches a course on Boys’ Psychosocial Development. Chu received her doctorate in Human Development and Psychology at Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she studied boys’ relationships and development in early childhood and adolescence with Carol Gilligan. Her research highlights boys’ relational strengths and how their gender socialization can impact their connections to themselves and to others. She is the author of When Boys Become Boys: Development, Relationships, and Masculinity (NYU Press, 2014) and co-editor of Adolescent Boys: Exploring Diverse Cultures of Boyhood (NYU Press, 2004). She developed curricula for The Representation Project’s film, The Mask You Live In, and currently serves as Chair of Movember Foundation’s Global Men’s Health Advisory Committee. She is also the mother of a seventeen-year-old boy.

About Joseph Derrick Nelson, PhD:

Joseph Derrick Nelson, PhD is Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Studies at Swarthmore College, and affiliated faculty with the Black Studies Program. He is also a Senior Research Fellow with the Center for the Study of Boys’ and Girls’ Lives at the University of Pennsylvania. His research to date has employed interdisciplinary frameworks to examine race, boyhood, and education, and within learning environments that largely serve Black students from neighborhoods with concentrated poverty. In his hometown of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he taught first-grade in a single-sex class of Black and Latino boys, in the high poverty neighborhood where he grew up.

About Michael Reichert, PhD:

Michael Reichert is a psychologist who has worked in a variety of clinical, school, community and research contexts over the course of his career. He serves as Executive Director of the Center for the Study of Boys’ and Girls’ Lives, a research collaborative at the University of Pennsylvania, and is supervising psychologist at The Haverford School outside Philadelphia. In clinical practice outside Philadelphia, he has long specialized in work with boys, men, and their families.

He led research teams that have conducted studies of boys’ education, resulting in presentations, publications and professional development workshops for educators throughout the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia. He also founded an urban youth development program in the tri-state region around Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which was recognized as a “promising practice” in violence prevention by the state’s Attorney General.

Reichert’s writing has been published in The Atlantic, New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Time, Fatherly, Good Men Project and others. His books include Reaching Boys, Teaching Boys: Lessons About What Works—and Why (Wiley/Jossey Bass, 2010), I Can Learn From You: Boys as Relational Learners (Harvard Educational Press, 2014), and How to Raise a Boy: The Power of Connection to Build Good Men.

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